erneo advanced CAES energy storage

Store Renewable Energy


Problems

1 Renewable energy has an inherent problem in that there is a strong fluctuation during production, being very much dependent on the current weather at site. This in turn leads to an “over production” where the energy that is being produced is not needed and subsequently causes grid instability which in turn forces the producers to either export the produced electricity into neighbouring grids (which is not always welcome). In turn the price of electricity can become negative i.e. the producer has to pay the entity taking the electricity. This cost is passed onto the end user!

2 If the production could be stored when not required and fed back into the grid when current production was not sufficient to cover the requirements this solves the issue of “over” production and grid instability.

3 There are several technologies which offer a solution of sorts however bulk energy storage in underground caverns offers the most stable solution and is scalable and there are very few geographical limitations with respect to locations.

4 The biggest hurdle when trying to store energy underground using the CAES technology is the massive temperature differences which are encountered during the charging (compression) phase and the discharge (decompression) phase. Which to date have not been satisfactorily resolved. This has been the brake on the implementation of CAES technology in its current form.

Solutions

1 The disadvantage of huge temperature changes in the caverns and surface installation due to the huge compression differentials and the subsequent necessity to store the heat generated during the storage phase with conventional CAES technology has been resolved through the implementation of the patented erneo technology

2 The patented erneo technology has a competitive advantage with respect to alternative storage technologies both in technical simplicity and financial requirements.

3 In addition to a Greenfield facility, both Brownfield facilities and existing gas storage facilities can implement the erneo technology to create energy “on demand”. With very short “cold start” times of less than three minutes, which is prerequisite to maintaining grid stability this is a major plus.

4 The erneo technology is based on gas storage operation technologies which have been implemented for decades and thus does not require any significant additional time consuming research. The erneo technology is ready and waiting.